Stem Save Invest in your child's future
 
Select Country
 
   
Create an account
Forgot password?
877-783-6728 (877-StemSave)

 

Stem Cell Research Center
 Clinical Trials
 Video Center
 Published Medical Research
 Diabetes
 Scientific Advisory Council


Clinical Trials Info
For more information on clinical trial studies registered around the world, please visit :

www.clinicaltrials.gov

Clinical Trials

Published Medical Research

08/07/2018 - Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Alveolar Bone Tissue Engineering for Cleft Lip and Palate Patients, DENTAL STEM CELLS

Study Description: The aim of this study is to perform the bone tissue engineering to reconstruct the alveolar bone defect in cleft lip and palate patients using mesenchymal stem cells from deciduous dental pulp associated with a collagen and hydroxyapatite biomaterial (Geistlich Bio-Oss®) through prospective qualitative and quantitative analysis of bone neoformation.

Click here to read more

Download
 
08/03/2018 - High Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma
Study Description: Current standard treatments for lymphoma involving the central nervous system include chemotherapy or whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). However, many patients do not respond to this treatment, and some of the patients who do respond relapse after treatment.

Previous research has shown that a stem cell transplant of a patient's own cells (autologous stem cell transplant) may be more effective for some patients with lymphoma involving the CNS. In previous research using autologous stem cell transplants for lymphoma involving the CNS, a conditioning regimen consisting of the drugs thiotepa, busulfan and cyclophosphamide (TCE) was used. These drugs have been shown to enter the nervous system.

In this research study, the investigators are adding the drug rituximab (Rituxan) to the drug cytarabine for the stem cell mobilization process. Cytarabine is a standard drug for mobilization. In addition, rituximab will be added to the conditioning regimen of thiotepa, busulfan and cyclophosphamide. Rituximab is approved by the FDA for the treatment of some types of lymphomas, but is not approved for use in lymphomas that involve the CNS. Rituximab is known to be able to enter the CNS. Previous research has suggested that it may help treat lymphoma that involves the CNS.

The goal of this research study is to see if adding rituximab to the stem cell mobilization and conditioning regimens helps treat lymphoma that involves the central nervous system.


Click here to read more

Download
 
08/01/2018 - Cyclophosphamide and rATG With Hematopoietic Stem Cell Support in Systemic Scleroderma
Study Description: Scleroderma is a systemic disorder categorized as an immunologically mediated disease that causes collagen deposition of skin and visceral organs. The molecular pathogenesis of scleroderma has been elusive, although vasculopathy and immune mediated mechanisms are thought to be important. Once extensive cutaneous or visceral disease occurs, prognosis is significantly shorter than the general population. Although various treatments have been tried, none of them seems to have changed the natural history of scleroderma. Standard dose immunosuppressive treatment has been disappointing. Recently, cyclophosphamide at 1-2 mg/kg/day orally or 800-1400 mg intravenous (IV) monthly for 6-9 months has proven effective in treatment of scleroderma alveolitis (1). Recent phase I studies of immunoablation with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) showed some promising data, but the exact efficacy is undetermined (2,3). We now propose, as a phase II randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT versus pulse cyclophosphamide in patients with systemic scleroderma.

Download
 
08/01/2018 - Lymphocyte Depletion and Stem Cell Transplantation to Treat Severe Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Study Description: This study will examine a new approach to treating patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that involves collecting stem cells (cells produced by the bone marrow that develop into blood cells) from the patient, completely shutting down the patient's immune system, and then giving back the patient's stem cells. SLE is a chronic, inflammatory disorder of the immune system that can affect many organs. It is called an autoimmune disease because the patient's lymphocytes (white blood cells that normally protect against invading organisms), go out of control and attack the body's own tissues.

Click here to read more

Download
 
07/31/2018 - Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis With Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells (KDD&MSV)
Study Description: In this prospective study we aim to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the implantation of 40 millions MSV in knees with osteoarthritis of grade II-IV (Kellgren and Lawrence). The working hypothesis proposes that MSV antiinflammatory effect will help healing of articular cartilage degeneration to a grade enough to be objectivized by questionnaires and imaging procedures. The study of quantitative changes in structure and composition of cartilage determined by MRI T2-mapping (Cartigram ) will be performed at 6, 12 and 24 months. Pain and disability will be assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), WOMAC, Lequesne Index and evaluation of the quality of life by Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) completed at 3, 6,12 and 24 months.

Download
 
07/26/2018 - Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells For Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (START)
Study Description: This is a Phase 1, open label, dose escalation, multi-center clinical trial of Allogeneic Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) for the treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The purpose of this study is to assess the safety of hMSCs in patients with ARDS.

Download
 
07/25/2018 - Efficacy Study of T Cell Depleted Allogeneic Non-myeloablative Stem Cell Transplant
Study Description: The central hypothesis of this study is that use of a less toxic chemotherapy preparative regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in combination with T cell depletion with alemtuzumab for patients with high risk hematologic malignancies will allow effective control of disease and improved disease free and overall survival compared with historical expectations. Specifically, the objectives are to estimate toxicity, disease free, progression free, event free and overall survival rates in patients treated with an alemtuzumab T cell depleted, reduced intensity preparative regimen followed by allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation; evaluate immune recovery following this reduced intensity allogeneic immunotherapy; develop an in vitro assay to allow patient individualized targeted dosing. The study population is HIV negative, adult patients who are not pregnant but have confirmed diagnosis of disease; must have Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) performance status (PS) 0, 1, or 2; must have a 3-6/6 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched related donor or 8/8 (A, B, C, DRB1, DQ are the primary determinants) or better HLA-matched unrelated donor who is evaluated and deemed able to provide peripheral blood stem cells (PBPCs) and/or marrow by the transplant team. The target population of patients is those with a high chance of progressive lymphoid or myelomatous diseases, progressive myeloid diseases, marrow failure syndromes or myeloproliferative disorders.

Download
 
07/25/2018 - HLA-Nonidentical Stem Cell and Natural Killer Cell Transplantation for Children Less the Two Years of Age With Hematologic Malignancies
Study Description: Recent studies of conventional chemotherapy for infants with high-risk hematologic malignancies show that the long-term disease-free survival is low. Although blood and marrow stem cell transplantation using an HLA identical sibling has improved the outcome for these children, less than 25% have this donor source available. Another option is haploidentical transplantation using a partially matched family member donor (i.e. parental donor).

Although haploidentical transplantation has proven curative for some patients, this procedure has been hindered by significant complications, primarily regimen-related toxicity including infection and graft versus host disease (GVHD). Building on prior institutional trials, this study will provide patients a haploidentical graft depleted of T lymphocytes using the investigational device, CliniMACS selection system. One week after the transplant procedure, patients will also receive an infusion of additional donor derived white blood cells called Natural Killer (NK) cells in an effort to decrease risks for rejection of the graft, disease relapse, and regimen related toxicity. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate 1 year survival in infants with high risk hematologic malignancies who receive this study treatment.


Click here to read more

Download
 
07/23/2018 - Intramyocardial Injection of Autologous Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-Bright Stem Cells for Therapeutic Angiogenesis (FOCUS Br)

Study Description: Recent studies have suggested that it may be possible to grow new blood vessels (angiogenesis) to supply the heart muscle that is currently not getting enough blood. One theory is that a certain type of stem cell, aldehyde dehydrogenase bright stem cells, may stimulate the growth of new vessels. After a bone marrow procedure, the special cells are separated and then injected back into the heart around the area of damage with a special guidance and injection system.

Once a patient meets all inclusion criteria and no exclusion criteria, he/she will be consented to the study and extensive baseline testing will be completed at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas. Once all baseline criteria are met, the patient has his/her own bone marrow harvested and later injected, if randomized to receive active treatment. The day after the bone marrow harvest, the patient is taken to the cardiac catheterization lab where NOGA mapping is performed and the processed cells or placebo are injected under electromechanical guidance into the affected areas of the left ventricle. The patient is usually discharged home the next day and returns for follow-up at weeks 1 and 4, and months 3 and 6, and at one year unless there is a crossover and then he/she begins baseline again at 6 months and follow-up for one more year. Follow-up testing, including quality of life and NOGA mapping, is done at the time of injection, as well as at 6 months.

Click here to read more

Download
 
07/23/2018 - Prospective Randomized Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery (PROMETHEUS)
Study Description: Heart attacks are a leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States. When a person has a heart attack, blood is unable to reach a certain area of the heart, and if the blood supply is not re-established quickly, that area of the heart can suffer permanent damage. While recovery from a heart attack can be managed through medications and lifestyle changes, these treatments can not reverse the original damage to the heart. Current research is focusing on the development of cell-based therapies using stem cells to repair organs that have been irreversibly damaged by disease. A specific form of stem cells, called adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has shown promise for heart repair. This study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of injecting MSCs into the heart to repair and restore heart function in people who have had a heart attack and who are having heart surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

Download
 
07/19/2018 - The Percutaneous Stem Cell Injection Delivery Effects on Neomyogenesis Pilot Study (The POSEIDON-Pilot Study)

Study Description: The technique of transplanting progenitor cells into a region of damaged myocardium, termed cellular cardiomyoplasty, is a potentially new therapeutic modality designed to replace or repair necrotic, scarred, or dysfunctional myocardium. Ideally, graft cells should be readily available, easy to culture to ensure adequate quantities for transplantation, and able to survive in host myocardium; often a hostile environment of limited blood supply and immunorejection. Whether effective cellularregenerative strategies require that administered cells differentiate into adult cardiomyocytes and couple electromechanically with the surrounding myocardium is increasingly controversial, and recent evidence suggests that this may not be required for effective cardiac repair. Most importantly, transplantation of graft cells should improve cardiac function and prevent adverse ventricular remodeling. To date, a number of candidate cells have been transplanted in experimental models, including fetal and neonatal cardiomyocytes, embryonic stem cell-derived myocytes, tissue engineered contractile grafts, skeletal myoblasts, several cell types derived from adult bone marrow, and cardiac precursors residing within the heart itself. There has been substantial clinical development in the use of whole bone marrow and skeletal myoblast preparations in studies enrolling both post-infarction patients, and patients with chronic ischemic left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The effects of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have also been studied clinically.

Currently, bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells represent highly promising modality for cardiac repair. The totality of evidence from trials investigating autologous whole bone marrow infusions into patients following myocardial infarction supports the safety of this approach. In terms of efficacy, increases in ejection fraction are reported in the majority of the trials.

Chronic ischemic left ventricular dysfunction resulting from heart disease is a common and problematic condition; definitive therapy in the form of heart transplantation is available to only a tiny minority of eligible patients. Cellular cardiomyoplasty for chronic heart failure has been studied less than for acute MI, but represents a potentially important alternative for this disease.

Click here to read more

Download
 
07/18/2018 - Autologous Stem Cells for Cardiac Angiogenesis (FOCUS HF)
Study Description: This is a phase 1, single-blind trial to evaluate the use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. The study hypothesis is that transendocardial injections of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells in patients with end-stage ischemic heart disease is safe, can promote neovascularization, and can improve perfusion and myocardial contractility. The primary object of this study will be to evaluate the safety of autologous-bone-marrow mononuclear cell injections. The secondary endpoint of the study is to assess the efficacy of autologous bone marrow cells in improving cardiac contractile function and functional outcome. The efficacy will be assessed on the basis of the treadmill Max VO2 (maximum volume oxygen uptake). Secondarily the efficacy will be assessed on the basis of clinical status and imaging rests, with follow-up extending to 1 year after enrollment.A maximum of 30 patients will be enrolled in the study. At the end of the 6-month visit. after the required angiogram with mapping and non-invasive testing is complete, the patients will be told whether they were in the control or the active group (stem cell therapy). Those in the control group will be told before final invasive testing, and those who consent may cross over to the active therapy arm and undergo the cell injection procedure (control, then stem cell therapy. In these patients, the foll-up angiogram and mapping procedure will also serve as the baseline procedure required for cell injection. Bone marrow mononuclear cells will be injected in an identical fashion, according to the same criteria described for the original treatment group, and these patients will have identical follow-up visits starting again at the baseline time-point and extending for up to 1 year.

Download
 
07/16/2018 - Partially Matched Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients With Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia or Refractory Cytopenias
Study Description: Due to an overall and disease free survival of 85% to 100%, allogeneic blood or bone marrow stem cell transplantation using an HLA matched sibling donor is the therapy of choice for patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Unfortunately, only about 25% of patients have such a donor. For patients with SAA lacking a matched sibling donor, immunosuppressive therapy is the current treatment of choice. Approximately 70% of these patients have a complete or partial response to immunosuppressive therapy, achieving transfusion independence and/or growth factor independence.

For the approximately 30% of patients who do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy or experience recurrence, alternative donor (matched unrelated, partially matched family member) transplantation is a treatment option. However, graft rejection and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) are significant barriers to success, decreasing event-free survival to 30% to 50%.

This study offers stem cell transplantation using a partially matched family member (haploidentical) donor to those patients with no available HLA-matched sibling or matched unrelated donor. In an attempt to reduce GVHD and regimen-related toxicity while maintaining adequate engraftment, we plan to infuse a highly purified stem cell graft. The Miltenyi Biotec CliniMACS CD3 depletion system will be used to derive a defined allogeneic graft highly enriched for CD34+ hematopoietic cells and depleted of CD3+ T-lymphocytes from G-CSF mobilized, donor-derived peripheral blood stem cells.

Patients 21 years of age and younger with refractory cytopenias are also eligible for this protocol as there are no other potentially curative therapies currently available for these conditions.

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the safety of transplantation using a haploidentical donor product engineered to targeted cell counts using the investigational CliniMACS device for patients with refractory severe aplastic anemia (SAA) or refractory cytopenias. The treatment plan would be considered unsafe if we can find this type of procedure is associated with a significantly higher treatment failure rate. Treatment failure is defined as any occurrence of the following events, overall grade III-IV acute GVHD, graft failure or death due to any cause within 100 days after transplant.


Click here to read more

Download
 
10/13/2015 - Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury
Abstract

The conventional treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) includes physical therapy and rehabilitation and in some cases may require surgical intervention. Although improved emergency care and aggressive treatment can help in preventing further damage and even restore minimal sensory functions, still a large proportion of patients suffer with prolonged disabilities. It led neurologists to search out for new treatment options for this otherwise debilitating disorder. Recent advances in research have developed a better understanding of stem cell biology especially their role in tissue repair and regeneration. Encouraging results in pre-clinical phase and limited human trials have proved that stem cells can be safely and effectively delivered to the injured site for regeneration of damaged tissue. Although a variety of cell types have been tried for their role in repair of spinal cord injury, majority of clinical trials employed stem cells taken from bone marrow especially mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Bone marrow MSCs are a good choice for regenerative therapies owing to advantages like ease of collection and ex-vivo culturing, immune tolerance and their ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types including neuronal lineage cells. Intravenous application or direct injection of MSCs into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via lumber puncture in animal models of SCI and brain trauma had shown that MSCs can migrate towards and integrate into injured spinal tissue and reduce cyst size and increase functional recovery. The literature indicates that acute, sub-acute and chronic injury can be a therapeutic target for MSC grafting. The mechanism of action may however vary among these conditions. In acute phase, MSC administration play anti-inflammatory role, while in sub-acute/chronic setting it may be used as neurostimulator and for cell bridging effect and possibly glial or neuronal cell replacement. The investigators propose a non-randomized, single group, open label, phase-I, interventional study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intrathecal delivery of patient's own (autologous) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of spinal cord injury. This will include determination of functional recovery (neuro-muscular control and sensation) in the affected area and overall improvement in quality of life of the patients and also take into account any side effects, if observed.

Click here to read the full article.

Download
 
10/13/2015 - Intravitreal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Advanced Glaucoma
Abstract

Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) therapy is a promising treatment for several degenerative diseases, including retinopathies and glaucoma, however no previous safety study involving humans has been conducted. The objective of this study is to evaluate effects of autologous bone marrow-derived MSC transplantation in the worst eye of 10 patients with legal bilateral blindness due to glaucoma. Primary outcome are types and severity of adverse effects. Secondary outcomes are changes in visual field, visual acuity, optical coherence tomography, and retinal ganglion cells function.

Click here to read the full article.

Download
 
10/13/2015 - Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation in Patients With Chronic Renal Failure Due to Polycystic Kidney Disease
Abstract

This study was designed to provide confirmation of safety of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy in chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).The investigators will assess the 18-month safety and potential efficacy of autologous MSCs as therapy for ADPKD. A total of 6 patients with ADPKD IV injection of high doses 2×106 of autologous mesenchymal stem cells / kg their weight, which will be derived from biopsies of their bone marrow. Assessments will be made at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after cell injection. Changes in GFR rate were evaluated by scan isotope.

Click here to read the full article.

Download
 
Published Research
Center
poster.jpg
Download and print the poster

Your Future is in the Research today




StemSave Blog
Feel free to start or join a discussion on any of the listed Published Research

blogspot2.jpg


American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
AAOMS Services Inc.
© StemSave | Contact Us | Privacy Policy